Training Tracks
Towards an Inclusive Peace 2018

Training tracks

Towards an Inclusive Peace 2018

During Towards an Inclusive Peace you can chose to be part of different training programs that focus on equipping you with tools for your work in the field, in your organization or community.

These trainings are run by different civil society organizations from around the world. You have the possibility to commit to one training track over three afternoons or join each day a different one.

In the following overview, you can find basic information about the different trainings that are diverse in its character and methodologies. All of them are interactive and your voice will be heard. If you have any questions regarding these trainings, please do not hesitate to contact us at inclusivepeace@cauxforum.org!

 
A. Self-care track

1. Presence-in-Action: Transforming conflict within and beyond ourselves

2. Human Rights Education for an Inclusive Peace

3. The Health Fountain Tool

4. Peace Café

 

B. Restorative Justice Track

1. Restorative Justice and Sociental Peace Interconnected: Ways to Empower Women Through Restorative Justice Initiatives

2. Inter-Religious Dialogue as a Tool for Peace

3. Gender perspectives in peacemaking: Addressing extremism inclusively and holistically

4. Ethics Education to Restore Relationships

5. Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation

6. Circle Processes: Demystifying Theory and Re-Mystifying Practice

 

 

 

A. Self-care track

 

1. Presence-in-Action: Transforming conflict within and beyond ourselves

Trainer: Louie Gardiner

So many of us are talking about the need for change. What can we do? Often, we see folk externalizing the problems and outsourcing the solutions. They reach for a tool believing it will fix everything, forgetting the most accessible and potent instrument available to them – themselves. The Potent 6 (P6) constellation is a framework that helps illuminate and transform what is going on within us. When we do this, we discover how we may be part of perpetuating extremism without realizing it. This new approach to human transformation shows how vital it is that we start with ourselves. The P6 is not a simplistic tool which practitioners talk about and DO to you!  It is an open the space for transformational change in ourselves first.

Objectives of the session:

  • Equips participants to navigate and transform our own internal seeds of judgement and discontent.
  • Enable participants to begin to embody 'Presence-in-action' and to become an increasingly potent force for healing, reconciliation and love in the world.
  • Offer new ways to see, understand and engage in the world – helping participants to embrace the complexity of reality.  
  • Help participants access and enhance your capacity to influence and navigate change in all aspects of your life.  

Louie Gardener is an experienced, Systemic OD consultant, Accredited Master Executive Coach, Coaching Supervisor, Doctoral Researcher, Life Coach and Fellow of the Royal Society of the Arts in the UK. She has been involved with IofC since 2010, bringing her authenticity, creativity, leadership, process facilitation and training skills to support the organization, design and delivery of Caux conferences, including Leading Change for a Sustainable World, Trust and Integrity in the Global Economy, Living Peace and Seeds of Inspiration. Her holistic, empathic understanding of the dynamics and patterns that play out in human systems is born of her deeply reflexive engagement with life, others and, most importantly, with herself. Louie is a passionate pioneer generating new approaches that unleash learning and facilitate human transformation individually and collectively.

 

 

2. Human Rights Education for an Inclusive Peace

Trainer: Elisa Gazzotti and Claire de Lavernette and Ilse Nol

The exhibition 'Transforming Lives: The power of Human Rights Education' was created to promote human rights education while reaching a wide public including those that are not necessarily familiar with what Human Rights are. This is a powerful tool that effectively presents current global issues on education and the challenges at the community level. It provides a space where people can gather, learn about the human rights education and get inspired to take action.  In this space, the workshop aims at bringing together various points of views and experiences around the world, engaging all participants in meaningful discussions to explore how human rights education can be an effective tool towards an inclusive peace. Facilitated by International Organization for the Right to Education and Freedom of Education (OIDEL), Soka Gakkai International (SGI).

Objectives of the session:

  • Gain understanding of the practical and theoretical applications of Human Rights Education and be equipped to utilize them in their own work.
  • Promote a space for reflection on the development of the individuals as responsible members of a free, peaceful, pluralist and inclusive society.
  • Reflect on the role of Human Rights Education as a powerful tool to prevent violence, hatred and discrimination and building a culture of peace.

Elisa Gazzotti works as programme coordinator for Human Rights Education for Soka Gakkai International Office for UN affairs based in Geneva, Switzerland. Recently she was appointed co-chair of the NGO Working Group on Human Rights Education and Learning in Geneva. Elisa holds an Executive Master in ‘International Humanitarian Law in Armed Conflicts’ from the Geneva Academy in Geneva, Switzerland and a Master in ‘International Relations’ from ‘Università degli Studi di Pavia’ in Italy. Before joining SGI UN Office for UN Affairs Elisa’s work focused on food security and gender equality in the MENA region collaborating with Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) of UN in Rome, Italy and United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) in Amman, Jordan.

 

 

 

Claire de Lavernette, born in 1959 in Paris, studied Law and worked in private business for many years before settling down in Geneva in 2004. Since then, she has been active in the field of human rights, advocating first at the World Movement of Mothers as UN Main Representative. Her priorities were the fight against violence against women and the girl child and also the recognition of the unremunerated work of mothers within the home, as an essential contribution for family and society. She joined OIDEL (International Organization for the Right to Education and Freedom of Education) in 2009, NGO which has been promoting the right to education for more than 30 years. She has been Co-Chair, then Chair of the NGO Working Group on Human Rights Education and Learning since 2009 and is dedicated to this important issue, deeply convinced that Human Rights Education is a powerful tool for building a culture of peace.

 

Ilse Nol has a background in education, religious diversity and inclusion. She worked as a teacher and trainer in the Dutch context, especially focusing on polarization, discrimination and global citizenship education. Having moved to Geneva in September 2017, she now is a programme officer in fundraising and product development for Globethics.net: An NGO that focuses on the integration of ethics in higher education. Ilse holds a master’s in education and teaching from Utrecht University and a master’s in religious diversity, policy and management from the Radboud University Nijmegen, both in the Netherlands. 

 

 

 

 

3. The Health Fountain Tool

Trainer: Sandra Crathern

The workshop seeks to promote a greater understanding of the process of personal transformation, in particular understanding the oneself and the role one can play in helping others. Understand the importance of how simple actions can have great impact, and the importance of looking after oneself by using the Health Fountain Tool, developed by Innavision.

Objective of the session:

  • Give participants the opportunity to discuss their own stories, from a ‘what it was like’, ‘what happened’, ‘’what it is like now’ approach. By conducting an honest personal inventory to effect personal change, key aspects of personal transformation will be discussed, such as: building rapport, spiritual connection, active listening, non-judgmentalism, maintaining authenticity, respecting other’s model of the world, telling meaningful stories.

Sandra Crathern is a Health and Wellbeing specialist using some unique tools. After spending over 30 years as a registered nurse, founded Innavision to help people identify areas in their lives that are not as balanced as they could be. She works with clients to evaluate whether their physical and emotional health are well balanced by harnessing specialist techniques. Clients can expect empathy, respect, understanding and most of all a sense of direction. In 2007 Sandra trained as an NLP master practitioner life coach and specialised in Health and Wellbeing. She obtained an ACC Accreditation in 2016. Sandra is a regular speaker at Champneys Health Spa, and for the Peel Cruise Agency as well as at businesses and events both nationally and internationally as a motivational speaker.

 

 

4. Peace Cafe

Trainer: Stephen Hinton

Peace Cafés are events run in the style of World Café with a focus on the four aspects of peace as promoted by Invest in Peace. They are focused on tuning in to appreciation and listening the other in a holistic way. They are a tool that can strengthen local communities by opening space where people can be themselves, express their ideas and find connections. The main purpose of this session is to present the Peace Café as a tool that can offer a space that can brings people and organizations together around the theme of peace. We hope that through the discussions and stories shared, people feel inspired and equipped to run such a space in their communities.

Objectives of the session:

  • Experience a Peace Café and the ways in which it can lead to honest sharing, inspiring conversations and active listening of different perspectives.
  • Learn how to facilitate such a session, while exploring the meaning of peace – the peace that resides within – in their own lives.
  • Identify best ways to support and cooperate with each other towards building a culture of peace.

Stephen Hinton is a facilitator with many years of experience. He worked with management training before joining Ericsson as a program manager. Later he worked as managing director of a sustainable water purification company before joining Invest in Peace which he co-founded. He believes that peace starts from an individual experience and from there peace with each other and peace with the earth manifests.  He believes we need to develop a peace culture, too, that includes formulating rules and building structures that provide solid foundations for peace. A frequent blogger and commentator of societal development, he has published several reports and white papers on the subject of the economic system and how could be redesigned to support a peace culture that is sustainable. Stephen has recently been concentrating on developing and running Peace Cafés as instruments of change together with partners from IofC.

 

B. Restorative Justice track

 

1. Restorative Justice and Societal Peace Interconnected: Ways to Empower Women Through Restorative Justice Initiatives 

Trainer: Maysaa Jaber

This workshop sheds light on the work that has been done in Iraq to build bridges between victims and perpetrators and to create a healthier and more productive environment for building sustainable peace and justice. The tool to be presented during the training session is the “Peer to Peer (P2P) tool to Challenge Extremism on Campus". It raises awareness of the plight of women in Mosul and calls into action to create sympathetic attitudes and a more positive and progressive mindset to help, support and empower women who survived the great injustices of ISIS.  The workshop will be interactional with a blend of academic and practical ideas and concepts.  

Objectives of the session:

  • Present the P2P tool and discuss with participants the use of surveys as tools to measure positive and negative attitudes towards the other and in potentially changing the hateful narratives.
  • Highlight issues related to gender-based violence, extremism and conflict in Iraq, and ways to correct and revise these by showing a restorative justice initiative in society.
  • Share with the participants how to create a restorative justice campaign, how to collect data and how to use this data in changing hateful narratives.

Maysaa Husam Jaber is a university lecturer at the Psychological Research Center, where she is the head of the Translation Unit. She completed a PhD in English and American Studies from the University of Manchester, UK, in 2011. Maysaa also lectures at the English Department, College of Education for Women, University of Baghdad, where she teaches different modules to undergraduate and postgraduate students and is involved in a number of projects of humanitarian and activist nature. She was a fellow in The University of Massachusetts Boston from September to November 2013. She has published with Palgrave, Cambridge Scholars, and The Arab World English Journal. Her first book: Criminal Femme Fatales in American Hardboiled Crime Fiction came out with Palgrave Macmillan in 2015.  

 

 

 

2. Inter-Religious Dialogue as a Tool for Peace

Trainer: Moise (Mike) Waltner

Engaging leaders from religious communities in Interreligious Dialogue (IRD) can play a significant role in transforming attitudes, perceptions, and relationships.  But, how can dialogue practices, skills and competencies be passed on to transform attitudes and perceptions of those who are at greatest risk of being effected by violence and extremism. Who are the leaders/institutions that need to be engaged?  What are the methods and tools available that will be effective to foster a culture of dialogue in the places they are most needed? This workshop will draw from the experiences of the KAICIID Fellows Programme and equip participants to better understand the role that religious leaders and Interreligious dialogue can contribute to creating more cohesive and peaceful societies. 

Objectives of the session:  

  • To appreciate the unique and vital the role that IRD and leaders from religious communities can play in creating more cohesive and peaceful societies. 
  • To be able to conceptualize IRD as a process.  
  • To reflect on the benefits and limits of IRD and to gain practical insight from into how IRD activities are designed and can be effectively contextualized in a wide variety of environments.  

Moise “Mike” Waltner is Programme Manager of the International Fellows Programme at the International Dialogue Centre in Vienna (KAICIID). He is an experienced trainer and programme manager with many years of experience working in the field of Interreligious/Interfaith relations. Mr. Waltner holds a BA in Religious Studies from Pennsylvania State University and an MDiv. from the Union Theological Seminary in the City of New York/Columbia University. Formerly he was Director of Operations at The Interfaith Centre of New York. He is also an ordained a priest in the Church of England and currently serves as Honorary Assistant Curate at Christ Church, Vienna (Anglican). 

 

 

 

3. Gender perspectives in peacemaking: Addressing extremism inclusively and holistically

Trainer: Melinda Holmes

This interactive workshop will delve into ‘how to’ address violent extremism inclusively and holistically and ensure gender perspectives in peacemaking. Using ICAN’s Better Peace Tool for inclusion, the workshop will offer practical guidance on how to move from addressing these issues as security and political processes to inclusive societal processes. This approach involves the meaningful engagement of diverse sectors from media and religion to education and economics. ICAN’s methodology uses case studies, including current examples from the Women’s Alliance for Security Leadership (WASL)—a global network of independent grassroots women-led initiatives, combined with small group discussion and interactive exercises.

Objectives of the session:

  • Present the Better Peace Tool, focusing on its applicability to addressing violent extremism in various contexts.
  • Develop a hands-on activity where participants will be given a “case” to examine and research, based on the principles of the Better Peace Tool.
  • Develop a strategy for addressing violent extremism inclusively and holistically with a gender perspective.

Melinda Holmes is a peacebuilding specialist, writer and strategist focusing on gender and political violence. She serves as senior adviser and program manager with the International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN). In this capacity, she is responsible for ICAN’s coordination of the Women’s Alliance for Security Leadership (WASL) and is ICAN’s focal point for co-leading the Global Solutions Exchange (GSX), a civil society led mechanism for structured and sustained dialogue with governments and multilateral organizations on the prevention of violent extremism. Melinda was a Visiting Fellow at LSE’s Centre for Women, Peace & Security during the 2016-2017 academic year. She is a contributing writer on gender for the forthcoming series of action guides on religion and peacebuilding from USIP, Salam Institute, and the Network for Religious and Traditional Peacemakers. Melinda graduated with a Master’s in international affairs from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, focusing on the gendered and religious dynamics of policy, conflict and peacebuilding.

 

 

4. Ethics Education to Restore Relationships

Trainer: Maria Lucia Uribe

As communities face ethical challenges trying to live with one another – sometimes responding violently, excluding the other, enhancing divisions and fragmenting the social fabric – in a world that privileges punishment and “us vs. them” dynamics, ethics education provides an alternative for the prevention of polarization, to respond positively to the challenges of living together, to learn to forgive and reconcile with one another, particularly those who have been excluded, have been victims of violence or have used violence to assert their beliefs and ideas. The Ethics Education Framework of Arigatou International supports restorative approaches through its values-based model by helping to create respectful relationships.

Objectives of the session:

  • Identify the ethical challenges of learning to live together with those who have been radicalized, as well as the ethical demands to provide spaces to encounter the other.
  • Put themselves in the place of the other and learn to approach others with an attitude of reconciliation.
  • Enter into an empathic dialogue to understand the needs of the others, challenge one’s own views and beliefs, and connect with one another.
  • Discuss collective actions to restore relationships individually and at the community levels.

Maria Lucia Uribe is the Executive Director of Arigatou International Geneva. She is currently the convener, on behalf of Arigatou International, of the Working Group on Children and Violence of Child Rights Connect. Previously she served as Coordinator of the Working Group on Education and Fragility for the Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies (INEE). She was co-responsible of the development of the Arigatou International Learning to Live Together Programme launched in collaboration with UNESCO and UNICEF. She currently heads the strategic implementation and expansion of Ethics Education for Children as a Knowledge and Action Hub with partners in more than 30 countries. Maria Lucia holds a Master in Peace and Conflict Transformation from the University of Basel, a specialization in Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and a Bachellor degree in International Relations and Finance in Colombia. Maria Lucia is also a fellow of the Ariane de Rothschild Fellowship.

 

5. Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation

Trainers: Chelsea Higgs Wise and Abigail Ballew

Truth, Racial Healing & Transformation (TRHT, a new initiative implemented through Initiatives of Change USA/Hope in Cities) is focused on truth-telling and narrative change, relationship building through interpersonal racial healing practices, and systems-level transformation to disrupt structural racism in the U.S. In the Trump era where violent extremism is on the rise, Chelsea and Abigail will introduce the work being undertaken by IofC USA using the TRHT framework to achieve large-scale systematic change. We will explore truth-telling as a tool to counter false narratives and catalyze honest conversations within communities.

Objectives of the session:

  • Expose participants to U.S. context in the Trump era and recent case studies of violent extremism
  • Identify narrative change opportunities to counter false narratives in the media
  • Practice narrative change as a tool to serve as catalyst for racial healing and systemic change

Chelsea Higgs Wise is a clinical social worker and intercultural communicator who specializes in connecting underserved and misrepresented communities with policymakers to advocate against racism and misogyny. Chelsea received her Master’s in Clinical Social Work from Virginia Commonwealth University and is an experienced event moderator who offers facilitated dialogue services for topics around race, history and feminism. As an activist who helps evolve narratives and policies, Chelsea has been an instrumental voice in numerous campaigns and was recently brought on as Narrative Change Officer to the Truth, Racial Healing, Transformation Enterprise granted by the W.K. Kellogg Foundation and implemented by Initiatives of Change USA. She's a regular contributor to RVA Magazine in political and artistic commentary and co-hosts a radio show. Chelsea values genuine connection, authentic relationships, and meaningful impact. She is fueled daily by her village of family, friends, and especially her young daughter, Chloe.

Abigail Ballew lives in Richmond, Virginia, USA. She has her master’s degree in social work with a focus in macro practice and nonprofit management, and works with IofC USA, focused on racial healing within the Richmond region. Abigail’s background includes working with refugees, adoptive families and birth families, secondary-age students, and adults and youth with physical, intellectual and developmental disabilities. For the past seven years, Abigail has engaged in facilitated dialogues in a variety of capacities as a way to foster new relationships and build trust across divides, and she now oversees these processes within her role in Richmond. She is an alumna of IofC USA’s Community Trustbuilding Fellowship (2015-2016) and the Caux Scholars Program (2017). In her free time, she enjoys traveling with her husband and visiting their siblings and parents living in Europe, Africa, and Asia.

 

 

6. Circle Processes: Demystifying Theory and Re-Mystifying Practice

Trainer: Diana Tovar-Rojas

Restorative justice practices, in particular circle processes (such as sentencing and peacemaking circles) have transformed violence by “restory-ing” and healing relationships between victims, wrongdoers and communities. With a restorative justice lens, this workshop offers an opportunity for participants to see themselves as dynamic bridges between 1) local wisdom and 2) national or international policies designed to transform violent extremism. By co-creating a reflective space, participants are invited to share their own stories of how they’ve tackled violent extremism in a circle process. Trusting the wisdom present in the room, we will explore together how radicalized behaviors have been transformed into testimonies of resilience and hope. Then, we will envision how to design restorative justice processes, that are rooted in local-based knowledge. 

Objectives of the session: 

  • Co-creating a reflective space where participants share their own stories of how they have witnessed the transformation of violent extremism in a circle process 
  • Envisioning the design of restorative justice processes rooted in local-based knowledge 

Diana Tovar-Rojas is a Colombian political scientist, peacebuilder, conflict transformation & restorative justice practitioner. She has studied and practiced human rights, international humanitarian law, dialogical, war-to-peace transitions and restorative justice processes. Due to her father’s kidnappings by the FARC guerrilla group, her personal, professional and spiritual journeys have been focused on discovering processes that transform violence into individual and collective healing and peace. Currently, she works as the Peacebuilding Network Coordinator at the Center for Justice and Peacebuilding

 

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